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Inspired by the Library

Books featuring University Library collections and programs

These volumes, many produced by local publisher Heyday Books, highlight the extraordinary collections and programs in Berkeley's University Library.

Beyond Words: 200 Years of Illustrated Diaries
Susan Snyder
(Heyday Books, 2011)

Beyond Words is a collection of excerpts from fifty illustrated diaries spanning two hundred years of adventure and contemplation. With diarists ranging from Beat poets, an eighteenth-century Spanish explorer and twelve-year-old girls to John Muir, these stories reveal much about the times in which they were written and the diarists’ inner worlds. Joyce Carol Oates says Beyond Words brings the reader into “abrupt, startling, and poignant intimacy with the wonderfully diverse diarists."

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Everyday Dogs: A Perpetual Calendar for Birthdays and Other Notable Dates
Mary Scott and Susan Snyder
(Heyday Books, 2011)

Everyday Dogs: A Perpetual Calendar for Birthdays and Other Notable Dates couples literary quotes about canines with historical images from the Bancroft Library. This useful keepsake that echoes a resounding truth: that through it all, our dogs will be there.

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Paris Portraits: Stories of Picasso, Matisse, Gertrude Stein, and Their Circle
Harriet Lane Levy
(Heyday Books, 2011)

This sparkling manuscript, long hidden in the archives of the University of California’s Bancroft Library, brings to life a vibrant and mythic time and place. In 1906, Harriet Levy (UC Berkeley alumna, 1886) was talked into moving to Paris by her friend Alice B. Toklas and found herself immersed in a world peopled by artists such as Matisse, Picasso, and Gertrude Stein. Her stories from that time enable us to visit a world that has left its mark on our imaginations—and will inspire generations of writers, poets, and artists to come.

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Desperate Passage: The Donner Party's Perilous Journey West
Ethan Rarick
(Oxford University Press, 2008)

Ethan Rarick serves as the director of the Center on Politics at Berkeley's Institute of Governmental Studies. The Bancroft Library offered him (as it does many other authors and researchers) rich source materials for his work. Describing Desperate Passage, author Simon Winchester said "This sober, unflinching look at one of the great tragedies of America's pioneering past tells us a great deal that is new about the Donner Party's trials. Rarick scythes away the myths of one of the nation's better-known sagas, and offers up this horrific but ennobling tale in all its freshly researched detail. Readers take heed: this is a tough book, but a gripping one."

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Impressions of the East: Treasures from the C.V. Starr East Asian Library
Deborah Rudolph
(Heyday Books, 2007)

An opulent look at East Asia's printed and handwritten treasures. Color woodblock prints, early maps of Asia and beyond, oracle bones, and gorgeously detailed scrolls are just some of the highlights in the collection of Berkeley's C. V. Starr East Asian Library. The book brings excitement and scholarly insight to the print and manuscript traditions of East Asia. Published by Heyday Books, the volume won the "Notable Contribution to Publishing" prize from the Commonwealth Club.

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Chinese Posters: Art from the Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution
Lincoln Cushing, Ann Tompkins
(Chronicle Books, 2007)

These brilliantly colorful images of cultural celebration, industrial development, agricultural production, and revolutionary heroes were displayed in homes and public spaces across the country during the Cultural Revolution. Chinese Posters collects 150 of the most striking of these posters and offers background on their social and political context and production. An essay by Ann Tompkins provides a personal account of living in Beijing during the Cultural Revolution. As one Amazon reviewer put it, "Say what you want about oppressive regimes, they always have the best propaganda.. . As both an art book and a history book, Chinese Posters succeeds beautifully." This collection was donated to Berkeley's C.V. Starr East Asian Library.

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Past Tents: The Way We Camped
Susan Snyder
(Heyday Books, 2006)

This cheeky yet accurate history of camping in the West is full of photographs and descriptions of family outings in the first years of the automobile, of campgrounds and campfires against the familiar backdrop of the Sierra Nevada, of the remarkable gear and "helpful" hints that accompanied outings to our newly minted state and national parks and forests. A humorous romp through one of Americans' favorite pastimes.

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Ira Nowinski's San Francisco
Ira Nowinski
(Heyday Books, 2006)

In this book, three faces of San Francisco are gloriously brought to life: the vibrant beat poet scene of North Beach, the defiant tenants of South of Market's bygone residential hotels, and the electrifying energy backstage and onstage at the San Francisco Opera.

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The Face of Poetry
edited by Zack Rogow, photography by Margaretta K. Mitchell
(UC Press, 2006)

This anthology of representative poems by readers in the "Lunch Poems" series showcases a diverse array of contemporary poets, including Jorie Graham, John Ashbery, Sharon Olds, Aleida Rodriguez and Ishmael Reed. The stunning black and white portrait photography by Margaretta K. Mitchell complements the introductory essays by editor Zack Rogow. The volume is introduced by Robert Hass, Berkeley professor, poet, and host of the Lunch Poems series.

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Testimonios: Early California through the Eyes of Women, 1815-1848
Rose Marie Beebe and Robert M. Senkewicz
(Heyday Books, 2006)

From the editors of the highly influential Lands of Promise and Despair, here are thirteen women's firsthand accounts from the time California was part of Spain and Mexico. Having lived through the gold rush and seen their country change so drastically, these women understood the need to tell the full story of the people and the places that were their California. Drawn from the Bancroft Library's collection, some of these documents are translated here into English for the first time.

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Exploring the Bancroft Library
Co-edited by Charles Faulhaber and Stephen Vincent
(Bancroft Library Signature Books, 2006)

In this centennial guide, readers are introduced to the day-to-day life of an institution devoted to the collection, preservation, and study of original documents. From an in-depth look at the way material is acquired and conserved to chapters by individual curators on the history and highlights of the collections entrusted to their care, this volume celebrates Bancroft's one hundred years on the Berkeley campus.

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Drawn West: Selections from the Robert B. Honeyman Jr. Collection of Early Californian and Western Art and Americana
Jack Von Euw & Genoa Shepley
(Heyday Books, 2004)

This intoxicating art book presents the best of the famed Honeyman Collection at the Bancroft Library: paintings and ephemera from the earliest days of the settlement of the West. Here are artists both recognizable and long-forgotten, whose work represents some of our first records of the once-exotic American frontier. California and the West in the days of exploration and settlement was a region full of adventure, danger and wonders. And before there were cameras, artists depicted all of it.

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Bear in Mind: The California Grizzly
Susan Snyder
(Heyday Books, 2003)

Once the most powerful and terrifying animal in the California landscape, the grizzly now lives in the imagination, a disembodied symbol of the romantic West. More than 150 images from the Bancroft Library's collections - newspaper illustrations, paintings, photo albums, sheet music, settler's diaries, fruit crate labels, and more - accompany the bear stories of Indians, explorers, vaqueros, forty-niners and naturalists. The result is a uniquely compelling natural history, a grand book worthy of its subject.

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