HIST 137: Immigration Across Time and Space

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  • Jennifer Dorner

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  • Office Location: 212/218 Doe Library
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About this Guide

Sarah Keyes

This guide has been archived

Please note: this course guide was created during a previous semester, and is no longer being actively maintained. For a list of current course guides, please see http://lib.berkeley.edu/alacarte/course-guides.

Quick Links

Library web site header

Read an introduction to the campus libraries for undergraduates.

Set up your computer for off campus access to library databases.

Need a map of the campus libraries?

Each library has its own hours.  Click on the calendar for each library to view a month at a time.

Library Workshop: Research 101

Unsure how to start a paper or research project? Think maybe you could stand to brush up ostudent with laptopn search strategies?

If this sounds familiar, Library Workshop: Research 101 has you covered. This interactive tutorial explores six stages of the research process. You can view it from start to finish, or focus on specific sections as needed:

1: Begin Your Research

Starting strategies, from choosing a topic to finding the right keywords.

2: Knowledge Cycle

The publication timeline, scholarly vs. popular sources, and differences in academic disciplines.

3: Finding Books

Search for books and other items in OskiCat, Cal's local library catalog.

4: Finding Articles

Locate and access articles in library research databases.

5: Make Citations

How to cite your sources correctly.

6: Basic Search

Common techniques for constructing searches that yield useful results.

7: Advanced Search

Specialized search strategies for targeting specific topics.

Searching Library Catalogs

Use OskiCat to locate materials related to your topic, including books, government publications, and audio and video recordings, in the libraries of UC Berkeley. OskiCat will show you the location and availability of the items that we own. See the guide for suggestions on constructing your searches.

Use Melvyl to locate materials related to your topic located at other campuses in the UC system. Next Generation Melvyl also allows you to expand your search to libraries worldwide. Clicking on the REQUEST button in the detailed view of a catalog record prompt you to fill out a form to request the item through our Interlibrary Loan office.

America History & Life and Historical Abstracts

America History & Life is the best database to use when looking for academic journal articles in the field of American and Canadian history. While Historical Abstracts is the best database to use when looking for academic journal articles in the field of modern world history (after 1450).

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  1. Enter terms related to your topic in the search boxes. If you want to specify where in the record your term(s) should be searched, you can select a search field from the optional Select a Field drop-down list.  Select a Boolean operator (AND, OR, NOT) to combine search boxes. AND is the default.
  2. Boolean/Phrase searching is the default type of search and is recommended.
  3. Choosing the option “linked full text” will only retrieve results that include links to the full text that reside within this database. This is NOT RECOMMENDED, since it doesn’t include the links to full text we provide through UC e-Links and will greatly limit the number of results you retrieve.
  4. Some scholarly materials are not peer reviewed so unless you are limiting your search to articles, you might avoid checking this box.
  5. This database lists content published since 1964, but you are able to limit your results to works published during certain years.
  6. A unique feature of this database is that it also allows you to limit your search results to works about a particular period of time.
  7. In addition to articles published in journals, the database includes listings for books, conference papers, disserations, and other scholarly materials.
  8. You also have the ability to limit your search to a particular type of work, such as book reviews or dissertations.
  9. Much of the content in the database is from English-language publications, but other languages are represented. The language limiter allows you to limit your results to just the languages you can read.

Search tips:

When accommodating variations in spelling, you can use wildcard characters represented by question mark ? or a pound sign #.

Use ? to replace a single character. Example: ne?t to find all citations containing neat, nest or next.

Use # when an alternate spelling may contain an extra character. Example: colo#r to find all citations containing color or colour.

Use the truncation symbol * (asterisk) to look for variant endings of a word. Example: comput* to find the words computer or computing.

Use “quotation marks” to search for an exact phrase.

You can also view a tutorial on Advanced Search in America: History and Life.

Primary Sources

This is a small sampling of digital collections available from the Library. For a complete list, go to Archival Collections and Primary Source Databases.

Microfilm Collections


American Immigrant Autobiographies: Manuscript Autobiographies from the Immigration History Research Center, University of Minnesota. Frederick, MD: UPA, c1989.
MICROFILM 71258
Guide: MICROFILM 71258 guide


Archives of the Settlement Movement. Woodbridge, CT: Research Publications, 1989-1990.
MICROFILM.78000
Guide: MICROFILM.78000.guide
Parts I-IV


Immigrant in America. Woodbridge. CT: Research Publications, 1983-1988.
MICROFILM 78024
Guide: MICROFILM 78024.guide
The collection is based on the holdings of The New York Public Library, Balch Institute for Ethnic Studies, Philadelphia, and The Immigration History Research Center at the University of Minnesota.

Records of the Immigration and Naturalization Service. Bethesda, MD: University Publications of America, c1992.
MICROFILM.71194
Guide: MICROFILM.71194.guide
Research collections in American immigration.
Series A: Subject Correspondence Files
Part I: Asian Immigration and Exclusion, 1906-1913.
Supplement to Part 1: Asian Immigration and Exclusion, 1898-1941.
Part II: Mexican Immigration 1906-1930.
Part III: Ellis Island, 1900-1933.
Part IV: European Investigations, 1898-1936.
Part V: Prostitution & "White Slavery," 1902-1933.

U.S. Hispanic Heritage: newspapers, literature, personal papers, correspondence. Leiden, The Netherlands: IDC Publishers, [1999].
MICROFILM 78404
Guide: MICROFILM 78404.guide

Voices from Ellis Island. Frederick, MD: University Publications of America, c1987.
MICROFICHE.24312
Guide: MICROFICHE.24312 guide
An Oral History of American Immigration: A Project of the Statue of Liberty/Ellis Island Foundation, 1988.

Newspapers

A more extensive list of online newspaper resources are available from the Library's Electronic Resources Finder. Some of these are only aggregated collections of links to U.S. and international newspapers, not all of them contain searchable, full-text articles.

Chicago Manual of Style

The Chicago Manual of Style includes two slightly different documentation systems: (1) notes and bibliography (NB) and (2) author-date. The notes and bibliography style is preferred by many in literature, history, and the arts.

In the NB system, you mark within your paper where you have cited something by adding a number, which refers to a detailed reference either at the bottom of the page (footnote) or at the end of the paper (endnote). These notes indicate the specific place in your source you are referencing.

The bibliography includes complete information for each item, with the items arranged in alphabetical order by author's last name.

Purdue's Writing Lab provides an example of a paper formatted using Chicago NB style.

 


Chicago Manual of Style Read at Google Read at Google

Citation Management Tools

Citation management tools help you manage your research, collect and cite sources, organize and store your PDFs, and create bibliographies in a variety of citation styles.  Each one has its strengths and weaknesses, but all are easier than doing it by hand!

  1. Zotero: Free software that keeps copies of what you find on the web, permits tagging, notation, full text searching of your library of resources, works with Word, and has a free web backup service. Zotero is available as a stand-alone application that syncs with Chrome and Safari, or as a bookmarklet for mobile browsers.
  2. RefWorks - web-based and free for UC Berkeley users. It allows you to create your own database by importing references and using them for footnotes and bibliographies, then works with Word to help you format references and a bibliography for your paper. Use the RefWorks New User Form to sign up.
  3. EndNote: Desktop software for managing your references and formatting bibliographies. You can purchase EndNote from the Cal Student Store

Tip: After creating a bibliography with a citation management tool, it's always good to double check the formatting; sometimes the software doesn't get it quite right.

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