COLWRIT 50: Researching Water in the West

Contact Corliss and Theresa

Corliss Lee

Contact:  (510) 768-7899  clee@library.berkeley.edu


Theresa Salazar

Contact:  (510) 643-8153 tsalazar@library.berkeley.edu

About this Guide

Library research guide for College Writing 50, Instructor: Steenland

Campus Library Map

Click on the image below to see a larger interactive version of the campus library map.

UC Berkeley Library campus map

You can also view/download a PDF map of library locations. For library contact information and building addresses, visit our directory.

Off-campus access to library resources

You can access UCB Library resources from off campus or via your laptop or other mobile device using one of two simple methods:

Proxy Server
After you make a one-time change in your web browser settings, the proxy server will ask you to log in with a CalNet ID or Library PIN when you click on the link to a licensed resource. See the setup instructions, FAQ, and Troubleshooting pages to configure your browser.

VPN (Virtual Private Network)
After you install and run the VPN "client" software on your computer, you can log in with a CalNet ID to establish a secure connection with the campus network.

Doe, Main Stacks, Moffitt Library floorplans

Looking for a location in Doe, Main Stacks or Moffitt?  Try the floorplans, or ask for assistance!

Library Hours

Hours on: 
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To select individual libraries/units, hold down the Ctrl key while clicking.

Getting Material from NRLF

A large part of the library's collection is stored off campus in an environmentally secure building called the Northern Regional Library Facility [NRLF].

Submit online requests via the REQUEST button in OskiCat to borrow material shelved at NRLF. To receive electronic or paper copies of book chapters or journal articles, submit an online request via the "Request an article from NRLF (photocopy or web delivery)" link that appears in eligible titles in OskiCat. Staff at public service desks of any campus library can assist you with further questions. 

EXCEPTION:  Materials belonging to Bancroft Library MUST be requested via their online form

nrlf request button in oskicat

Log in to Request with your Calnet ID and fill out the screens.  Choose the volume you want, for periodicals:

nrlf request item selection

Requesting Materials from Other Libraries

If UCB does not own the item you need, we will borrow it for you from another library, if possible.  We need a specific citation (example, for books - title, author, date of publication, publisher; for articles, title, author, journal/publication title, date, page numbers).

If you are in MELVYL and find the record for an item UCB doesn't own, click on the "Request" button to initiate the request.

If the item isn't owned by another UC, pull down the "Libraries to search" menu in MELVYL to "Libraries Worldwide" and re-try the search.  If you find the item, click on the "Request" button to initiate the request.

If you are not using MELVYL, use the online Interlibrary Loan forms to request an item.  Track the progress of your request via "My ILL Requests."

The Bancroft Library

The Bancroft Library is one of the treasures of the campus and one of the world's great libraries for the history of the American West.

How to Use The Bancroft Library

1.  Be prepared!  Read secondary sources and know something about your topic before you ask for help.

2.  Search OskiCat, limiting your search to Bancroft Library.  Also search for Bancroft materials in the Online Archive of California, limiting to the Bancroft Library.

3.  Learn how to use The Bancroft.  Read about Access (bring a quarter for lockers!) and Registration (bring two pieces of ID!) .

BEFORE YOU GO:  Search OskiCat!  if the item is in storage ("NRLF") and owned by The Bancroft Library, do not use the Request button in OskiCat.  Instead, use the Bancroft's online request form AT LEAST 72 hours in advance (they prefer a week.)

If you have 72 hours in advance, you can also use the online request form for materials not in storage; that will speed things up when you arrive.  If you don't have that much advance notice, don't bother.

Bring call numbers, titles, etc. with you.  You will fill out a form to present to the Circulation Desk and materials will be paged and brought to you.

4.     Read about the new camera policy ($10/day and no flash!) or about getting photocopies.

5.     Ask for assistance at The Bancroft Library's reference desk.

6.     If the collection you're interested in has a finding aid (guide), use it!  Some of the finding aids are online, including the Finding Aid for the Japanese American Evacuation and Resettlement Collection.

This guide has been archived

Please note: this course guide was created during a previous semester, and is no longer being actively maintained. For a list of current course guides, please see http://lib.berkeley.edu/alacarte/course-guides.

Examples of Background Sources


California A to Z : an encyclopedia of the golden state


The encyclopedia of California


California : an environmental atlas & guide


California Indians : primary resources : a guide to manuscripts, artifacts, documents, serials, music, and illustrations


A companion to California


Historical atlas of California

Finding all Library Materials - except articles

To find books, DVDs, maps, sound recordings, manuscripts, and much more - everything except articles - use a library catalog.

OskiCat = most UC Berkeley libraries

MELVYL = all UC campus libraries, including all UC Berkeley libraries

What's the difference?  more details here

For each item make sure you know the name of the physical library, call number, and whether or not it's checked out, library use only, etc.

Call numbers are on the spine of the book; learn how to read them so you can find what you need on the shelves.

SMS and QR Codes in OskiCat

You can now text yourself a call number or use a QR code reader to find the location of an item in the UCB Library. Just click on a title in your OskiCat search results, and both options will be displayed on the right.

SMS and QR image

Google

(of course!) but don't forget:

Google Images

Google News (archive)

Google Books

Google Scholar (see)

And When You Find It...Evaluate It!

You already know that you should evaluate anything you find on the Internet.  Here are some reminders of what to look for.

Why Can't I Just Use Google?

If you want to use Google for research, use Google Books or Google Scholar.

Use the Advanced Search for more searching options.

Remember that Google Books search results do not necessarily include the full text of the book; some include no text at all, some include a limited preview (only some pages of the book).

When you use Google Scholar, make sure to update your Scholar Preferences (see below) so you'll be able to use UC e-links to find the UC Berkeley library locations/online availability of the articles.

Step 1: If you haven't already done this, set up your proxy server access by following the directions at http://proxy.lib.berkeley.edu/. When you get to a point where you are accessing resources that the Library pays for, you will be prompted for your CalNet ID and password. For more help see: http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/doemoff/tutorials/proxy.html

Step 2: Change your “Scholar Preferences.” Access these by clicking on the small icon in the upper right of the screen.

Step 3: In search box next to "Library Links," type in University of California Berkeley and click on “Find Library”

Step 4: Check all the boxes next to "University of California Berkeley"

Step 5: Click on "Save Preferences" at bottom of page

Sample Article Databases

Citation Management Tools

Citation management tools help you manage your research, collect and cite sources, organize and store your PDFs, and create bibliographies in a variety of citation styles.  Each one has its strengths and weaknesses, but all are easier than doing it by hand!

  1. Zotero: A free plug-in for the Firefox browser: keeps copies of what you find on the web, permits tagging, notation, full text searching of your library of resources, works with Word, and has a free web backup service. Zotero is also available as a stand-alone application that syncs with Chrome and Safari, or as a bookmarklet for mobile browsers.
  2. RefWorks - web-based and free for UC Berkeley users. It allows you to create your own database by importing references and using them for footnotes and bibliographies, then works with Word to help you format references and a bibliography for your paper. Use the RefWorks New User Form to sign up.
  3. EndNote: Desktop software for managing your references and formatting bibliographies. You can purchase EndNote from the Cal Student Store

Tip: After creating a bibliography with a citation management tool, it's always good to double check the formatting; sometimes the software doesn't get it quite right.

Zotero Tips

If you've never used Zotero before, use the QuickStart Guide to get started.

Change your preferences if you want  Zotero to

To use Zotero to find specific articles in our library's databases, set up the Open URL resolver with this link: http://ucelinks.cdlib.org:8888/sfx_local? 

An in-depth discussion of the relative virtues of Endnote and Zotero,

 

How to Avoid Plagiarism

In order to avoid plagiarism, you must give credit when

Recommendations

 

This content is part of the Understanding Plagiarism tutorial created by the Indiana University School of Education.

Citing Your Sources

The UCB Library Guide to Citing Your Sources discusses why you should cite your sources and links to campus resources about plagiarism.  It also includes links to guides for frequently used citation styles.  Also:

Basic Government/Legal Sources

Library home > Libraries and Collections A-Z > Government Information > Federal:  Supreme Court/Judiciary

and

Library home > Libraries and Collections A-Z > Government Information > California Government > Judicial Branch

 

Historical Government Information on Hetch Hetchy

American Memory (Library of Congress)

Virtual Museum of the City of San Francisco

ProQuest Congressional

One stop shopping for U.S. congressional publications. Provides index and abstracts of congressional publications back to 1789, including full text of published Congressional Hearings from 1824-present (unpublished until 1979), full text Committee Prints from 1830-present, full text Congressional Research Service (CRS) Reports from 1916-present, full text United States Congressional Serial Set (and its various former titles) from 1789-present, and legislative histories from 1970-present. For more information on how to find hearings, consult the Congressional Tutorials homepage

 

Intro to Finding Court Cases

First, you need to know what court(s) handled the case in question.  The Federal court system consists of:

Supreme Court
13 Courts of Appeal
94 District Courts

Each state has its own judicial system, usually including a state Supreme Court.

Each court decides which of its decisions will be published. 

Published decisions:  use Lexis-Nexis Academic   ("Look up a legal case")

Besides the decisions, major documents in Supreme Court cases may be published; see:

Documents for other courts are much harder to access, and usually require an in-person visit to access the documents.  The UCB Law Library has databases that may include this information but these databases are often restricted to current law students.

Law Library ; click on "Ask Us" to chat with a law librarian

Email a UCB government document specialist

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Corliss Wants Your Feedback!

Please take just a second to give me some feedback on the workshop/course page.  Anonymously, of course.  Future generations of students will thank you!

Getting Help

Other ways to get help:  in person, by e-mail, using specialized chat services

And of course:  e-mail Corliss or email Theresa (Bancroft Library)

Research Advisory Service

Research Advisory Service for Cal Undergraduates

Book a 30-minute appointment with a librarian who will help refine and focus research inquiries, identify useful online and print sources, and develop search strategies for humanities and social sciences topics (examples of research topics).

Schedule, view, edit or cancel your appointment online (CalNetID required)

This service is for Cal undergraduates only. Graduate students and faculty should contact the library liaison to their department or program for specialized reference consultations.

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