HIST 101: Betwixt and Between in the United States: Seminar in Historical Research and Writing

Contact Your Librarian

  • Heather Thams
  • heather thams photo

  • Office Hours: Mon/Tues/Thurs 10am-5pm (by appointment)
  • Office Location: 212 Doe Library
  • Contact Info:

About this Guide

A guide for students in Mackenzie Moore's section of History 101, a seminar in historical research and writing for history majors.

This guide has been archived

Please note: this course guide was created during a previous semester, and is no longer being actively maintained. For a list of current course guides, please see http://lib.berkeley.edu/alacarte/course-guides.

Starting Points

1.  Read an introduction to the campus libraries for undergraduates.Campanile and Golden Gate Bridge

2.  Set up your computer for off campus access to library databases.

3.  Need a map of the campus libraries? Doe and Moffitt floor plans are here.

4.  Each library has its own hours and they may change on holidays and between semesters - click on the calendar for each library to view a month at a time.

5.  Information about citing your sources and links to guides for frequently used citation styles here.

Staying Informed

blog screenshot

The UC Berkeley History Collection News blog will keep you informed of new digital collections, trials of resources, workshops, events related to History collections, and other news of interest to researchers in History. It is maintained by Jennifer Dorner, History Librarian in Doe Library. Options for accessing the blog include:

Printing and Scanning in the Libraries

All libraries on campus are equipped with "bookscan stations," which allow you to:

Scanning to a USB drive is free.  Moffitt Copy Center sells flash drives.

Scanning documents to print is 8 cents a page (color printing: 60 cents a page).picture of open book

In order to send documents to the printer from any of the public computers in the libraries, you must have the following:

Have more questions? There's more info here.

Doe, Main Stacks, Moffitt Library Floorplans

Looking for a location or call number in Doe, Main Stacks or Moffitt?  Try the floorplans, or ask for assistance!

Searching Library Catalogs

oskicat logo

Use OskiCat to locate materials related to your topic, including books, government publications, and  audio and video recordings, in the libraries of UC Berkeley. OskiCat will show you the location and availability of the items that we own.

melvyl logo

 

Use Melvyl to locate materials related to your topic located at other campuses in the UC system, or worldwide. You can use the Request button to request an item from another library, if we don't own it.

Melvyl has changed as of January 2012, and now includes many more articles.  Detailed Melvyl help.

Getting Material from NRLF

A large part of the library's collection is stored off campus in an environmentally secure building called the Northern Regional Library Facility [NRLF].

Submit online requests via the REQUEST button in OskiCat to borrow material shelved at NRLF. To receive electronic or paper copies of book chapters or journal articles, submit an online request via the "Request an article from NRLF (photocopy or web delivery)" link that appears in eligible titles in OskiCat. Staff at public service desks of any campus library can assist you with further questions. 

nrlf request button in oskicat

Log in to Request with your Calnet ID and fill out the screens.  Choose the volume you want, for periodicals:

nrlf request item selection

Find Dissertations

Find Dissertations by searching Dissertations and Theses (Dissertation Abstracts) Full Text, which indexes graduate dissertations from over 1,000 North American, and selected European, graduate schools and universities from 1861 to the present. Dissertations published since 1980 include brief abstracts written by the authors and some feature 24-page excerpts. The database offers full text for most of the dissertations added since 1997 and some full text coverage for older graduate works.

Also see Find Dissertations and Theses for other specialized sources. Dissertations completed at UC Berkeley can be found in OskiCat, using the feature allowing you to limit to dissertations/theses:

Dissertations/Theses in Oskicat

Older dissertations not available full text may be obtained through Interlibrary Loan or using the "Request" option in Melvyl.

OskiCat Search Terms

Here are some terms you can use in OskiCat or Melvyl that may help you find books on your topic. Remember, these search engines only let you search brief information about the books - you're not searching in the full text of the books themselves! If you're not getting enough results, try leaving out some search terms, searching for a broader topic or using fewer terms, using Google Books, or asking a librarian.

All of these terms are Library of Congress subject headings -- which means you'll get the most complete results if you enter them exactly as typed. Uou can combine more than one term for a more focused search. Using the default Keyword search in OskiCat will usually give you the best results.

Read more

History and American Studies

These databases index secondary sources in history, American studies, and cultural studies - if the PDF of the full text isn't available in the database, look for the UC-eLinks button (UC-eLinks button).

Where's the PDF?

Many article databases contain information about articles (citations or abstracts), not the entire text of the article.  Once you've used an article database to find articles on your topic, you may need to use the UC-eLinks button (UC-eLinks  button)  in order to locate and read the full text of the article. The UC-eLinks button appears in nearly all the databases available from the UCB Library website.

UC-eLinks will link you to the online full text of an article if UCB has paid for online access; otherwise, UC-eLinks will help you locate a print copy on the shelf in the library. If UCB doesn't own the article in print or online format, UC-eLinks can also help you order a copy from another library.

For more information, watch this video tutorial (about 4 min.)

You can also set up UC-eLinks to work with Google Scholar.  For more information, watch this video tutorial (about 2 min.)

Google Scholar

google scholar

Google Scholar provides easy access to a lot of full text content paid for by The Library, as well as other scholarly or professional content available freely on the Web. Their Help pages describe more fully what is included in this resource.

With a Google account you can exploit special features in Google Scholar.

Set up a Google Scholar Alert to be automatically notified when new articles are added to Google on topics of interest. Do your search in Google Scholar. Look in the green toolbar for the envelope icon, and click it.  New items will be sent to your email account as they are found by Google.

Make Google display links to full text of articles that Berkeley subscribes to. Open Scholar.  Click on the gear icon gear icon in the upper right corner, and choose 'scholar preferences'. In the new window, scroll down to 'Library Links', type the word Berkeley.  Choose University of California, Berkeley-- UC eLinks, and Open Worldcat Search.

Ever wanted to trace an article’s impact? Google now permits searching within citing articles. Do a Google Scholar search. Click on the "Cited by" link under a citation and select the "Search within articles citing..." checkbox.

More Resources

doe libraryCan't find an article database in this guide that's relevant for your topic? Use the Library's Article Databases by Subject page to find and search recommended databases for your subject area. Or try the general Find Articles page to see a complete listing of all article databases, including news databases and book and film review databases.

Searching OskiCat for Primary Sources

Certain words and phrases (part of the Library of Congress Subject Headings cmagnifying glass and computer keyboardlassification system) will find primary sources in library catalogs.  You can use these in OskiCat or Melvyl:

-correspondence
-sources
-diaries
-personal narratives
-interviews
-speeches
-documents
-archives
-early works to 1800
-newspapers

Examples:

Primary Sources Online - Overview

The texts of primary sources are available online in two different ways:

Comprehensive list of library databases of primary sources in US History    http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/a/a4/Flag_of_the_United_States.svg/200px-Flag_of_the_United_States.svg.png

Selected list of library databases of primary sources in European history  Flag of the European Union

Primary Sources by country or continent     globe

Comprehensive list of library databases of primary sources worldwide

Online Archive of California & Calisphere

oac home page

Guides to over 20,000 collections housed in 200 libraries, archives, historical societies, special collections and museums across California are searchable at the  Online Archive of California (OAC). Collection guides, also known as finding aids, are descriptive guides to archival (primary source) collections. These collections may be physically located in archives or digitized on the web. The guides help users learn more about the scope of a collection so they know if it is likely to meet their research needs.

calisphere home page

Digitized versions of photographs, documents, newspapers, political cartoons, works of art, diaries, transcribed oral histories, and other cultural artifacts that are contributed by these California institutions to the OAC make up the content included in Calisphere.

Primary Sources: Newspapers

Microfilm & Microfiche

Before digital storage became easy and cheap, microfilm was a way for libraries to maintain large collections of newspapers, government documents, and historical documents while saving physical storage space. The UC Berkeley Libraries still have extensive microform (microfilm and microfiche) collections, containing valuable information for researchers.

Since each roll of microfilm contains thousands of tiny images of the original pages of a document, you'll need a microfilm reader to magnify the images enough to read them. The UC Berkeley Newspapers and Microforms Department (40 Doe Library) has machines that read, print, and scan images from microfilm and microfiche.

Microfilm and microfiche owned by the UC Berkeley Libraries can be found through OskiCat; use Advanced Keyword Search to limit your search to "All Microforms." In the News/Micro collection, microfilm rolls and microfiche cards are shelved with their own numbering system; click here for a PDF of the collection's floorplan.

Primary Source Microfilm Collections in U.S. History

Abolition and Emancipation. Marlborough, Eng.: Adam Matthew Publications, 1996.
MICROFILM 77764
Guide: MICROFILM 77764.guide
Part 1: Papers of Thomas Clarkson, William Lloyd Garrison, Zachary Macaulay, Harriet Martineau, Harriet Beecher Stowe & William Wilberforce from the Huntington Library; Part 4: The Granville Sharp Papers from Gloucestershire Record Office.

Advice Literature in America. Marlborough, Eng.: Adam Matthew Publications, 2001.
MICROFILM 78513
Guide: MICROFILM 78513.guide
Part I: The Schlesinger Collection of Etiquette and Advice Books;
Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Harvard University.

America, 1935-1946: The photographs of the U. S. Department of Agriculture, Farm Security Administration, and the U.S. Office of War Information.
Cambridge, England : Chadwyck-Healey ; Teaneck, N.J: Somerset House, 1980.
MICROFICHE 28570
Guide: MICROFICHE 28570.guide

American Immigrant Autobiographies: Manuscript Autobiographies from the Immigration History Research Center, University of Minnesota. Frederick, MD: UPA, c1989.
MICROFILM 71258
Guide: MICROFILM 71258 guide

American Women's Diaries: Southern Women 19th Century .
New Canaan, CT : Readex, [1988-1990].
MICROFILM.77628
Guide: MICROFILM.77628.guide

American Women's Diaries: Western Women. New Canaan, CT: Readex, [1991].
BANC FILM 1976
Guide: BANC FILM 707
500 published and unpublished works by and about women in the Western United States during the 18th and 19th centuries, including diaries, autobiographies, biographies, personal histories, transcripts of oral interviews, and pioneer histories.
Read more

The Bancroft Library

The Bancroft Library is one of the treasures of the campus, and one of the world's great libraries for the history of the Bancroft Library interiorAmerican West.

Some Bancroft materials are available online via Calisphere, which includes primary sources from many California libraries and museums.

Before you go:

1.  Be prepared! Read secondary sources and know something about your topic.

2.  Search OskiCat so you can bring call numbers with you. Use the Entire Collection pull-down menu in OskiCat to limit your search to the Bancroft Library only. (Remember that there are primary sources in many other campus libraries as well.)

3.  Learn about the Bancroft's policies: read about Access (bring a quarter for lockers) and Registration (bring two pieces of ID).  You may want to read about the new camera policy ($10/day, no flash) or about getting photocopies.

During your visit:

  1. Store your belongings in the lockers provided, located on the right-hand side of the east entrance. Pass the security guard station and proceed up one level by stairs or elevator to the Reading Room and Seminar Rooms (3rd floor).
  2. Check in at the Registration Desk, located on the left-hand side of the entrance to the Reference Center.
  3. Go to the Circulation Desk, where you will fill out a form for the items you need. The items will be paged and brought to you. (Remember to bring call numbers, titles, etc. with you!)
  4. For research-related questions, ask for assistance at the Reference Desk.

How to Get to the Bancroft Library

The Bancroft is open from 10am to 5pm Monday-Friday (closed on weekends and holidays; shorter hours during Intersession).  Paging ends 30 minutes before closing; this means that if you want to use Bancroft materials until 5pm, you need to arrive and request your materials at the circulation desk before 4:30pm.

The Bancroft Library is on the second floor of Doe, on the east side (the side closest to the Campanile). See a floor plan of Doe Library 2nd floor (pdf).

Other Places to Look

As a UC Berkeley student, you also have access to the special collections at Stanford.

The Online Archive of California searches the digitized and non-digitized archival collections held by libraries and other institutions around California.

ArchiveGrid helps you find out which manuscript and archival collections are owned by institutions around the world.

Citation Management Tools

Citation management tools help you manage your research, collect and cite sources, and create bibliographies in a variety of citation styles.  Each one has its strengths and weaknesses, but any are easier than doing it by hand!

  1. Zotero: A free plug-in that works exclusively with the Firefox browser: keeps copies of what you find on the web, permits tagging, notation, full text searching of your library of resources, works with Word, and has a free web backup service. A guide is available.
  2. RefWorks - free for UC Berkeley users. It allows you to create your own database by importing references and using them for footnotes and bibliographies. Use the RefWorks New User Form to sign up. A guide is available.
  3. EndNote: may be purchased from UC Berkeley's Software Central.

It's always good to double check the formatting -- sometimes the software doesn't get it quite right.

Research Advisory Service

Research Advisory Service for Cal Undergraduates

Book a 30-minute appointment with a librarian who will help refine and focus research inquiries, identify useful online and print sources, and develop search strategies for humanities and social sciences topics.

Schedule, view, edit or cancel your appointment online (CalNetID required)

This service is for Cal undergraduates only. Graduate students and faculty should contact the library liaison to their department or program for specialized reference consultations.

Scheduling a consultation

bcal screenshot Some reference questions can't be easily answered over e-mail; we are happy to talk with you in person or over the phone if your question is more complex or if you'd like a more in-depth consultation. Trying to schedule appointments via email is time-consuming. Here are some alternatives:

1. Call Jennifer Dorner (History Librarian) at 510-768-7059.

2. Use bCal to find Jennifer's calendar or Heather's calendar (dorner@berkeley.edu; thams@berkeley.edu) and locate a free slot between 9-5, Mon-Fri for Jennifer, and between 9-5, M/T/Th for Heather. You can propose an appointment in bCal or contact one of us by email to confirm the appointment time.

3. If you don't use bCal yet and you have a gmail address, you can send that to Jennifer or Heather and we'll grant you access to our calendars.

History 101 Resources

Reading, Writing, and Researching for History: A Guide for College Students (Patrick Rael, Bowdoin College) - This is a really detailed, step-by-step guide to writing a serious history paper, from asking good questions to keeping a research journal to citing archival sources.

Purdue Online Writing Lab

History 101 Manual, UC Berkeley History Department (from 2002 - library information is outdated)

Resources for Reading and Writing History (Mark Brilliant, UCB - lots of good strategic info, some library information is outdated)

History Department: Faculty Office Hours and History 101 FAQ

Get Help in the Library

"There are no dumb questions!" student at reference desk

 

 

That's the philosophy of reference librarians, who are here to save you time and trouble. If you get stuck, you can talk to a reference librarian at any campus library

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